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 Riding/Safety Tips

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Undervein 600
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Number of posts : 270
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PostSubject: Riding/Safety Tips   Mon Sep 10, 2007 3:20 pm

This thread is open for all of you that want to share Riding/Safety tips while on yer bike. Laughing
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PostSubject: Cornering Tips   Mon Sep 10, 2007 3:21 pm

It could be that my favorite thing about riding motorcycles is the way they turn, leaning over to balance all the forces involved in making a single-track vehicle change directions and go right where you want it. Even after riding through corners hundreds of thousands — probably millions — of times, the process of riding a motorcycle around a turn in the road or racetrack is still exciting and challenging. I'm also sure that there haven't been more than a handful of times in more than 40 years and a million miles of riding that I arrived at the entry to a corner and entered it just perfectly, with exactly the right amount of handlebar pressure, body English, throttle opening and lean angle to deliver me to the ideal point at the apex of the turn without minute adjustments. You virtually always have to make some sort of adjustment as you commit to a line around the turn. To keep all those forces balanced, you can't make any violent changes or you'll quickly find yourself flat-side-down. To avoid doing that, you need to to be sure of what lies ahead .

Yet the moment of commitment to a corner is the crucial one, and the way you do it should depend almost entirely on what you see as the corner appears ahead of you. Maybe you have ridden it thousands of times. Maybe this is your first time drawing an arc on this particular stretch of pavement. But even in a corner that I ride every day, one where I know every crack and ripple in the asphalt, I can't commit until my eyes have evaluated the surface first. Even if you have ridden through just minutes before, the situation may have changed. A car might have stopped just behind the embankment or bushes that hide the exit to the corner, or a passing vehicle could have left oil, water, sand, tacks, a ladder, an inflatable wading pool or hundreds of other things in the corner that will upset the perfect balance you created on your last pass.

So before I commit, I need to be able to observe and evaluate the entire surface I will ride across while I'm leaning over. Many turns don't permit you to see completely through them as you arrive. Any number of roadside objects can block your view of the road ahead. So what do you do? Well, I don't commit myself to more than I can see. I reduce my speed and, if conditions permit, enter the bend on the outside of my lane, which normally gives me the best and earliest view of the road ahead.

However, there are circumstances where entering a curve wide may not be the best approach. A wide entry to a right-hander means you are closer to the centerline and therefore more likely to come eyeball-to-hood-ornament with a car (or another rider) that has crossed the center line to straighten out the corner. And if the corner is questionable — say it looks sandy or greasy — straightening up in response to that squirming sensation from your tires could make you cross the center line. In that situation, I'll forego the added up-the-road visibility and tiptoe around the inside of my lane at a speed that permits me to respond to anything I might encounter. Just imagine that there may be a boulder up ahead and you'll probably approach at a safe speed. I have learned that this is easier to visualize once you have actually come around a turn and found a recently arrived boulder there to greet you.

As I proceed around the corner, my eyes repeatedly trace the line I plan to take as far as I can see up the road and back to a short ways in front of the bike. The standard recommendation is to look as far as you can up the road, but perhaps because my vision is less than perfect, I want to double-check and reevaluate the road surface as I get closer. When I can see all the way to the exit, only then do I commit to leaning over hard.

Unfortunately, not all hazards are visible. Freshly spilled diesel fuel and some coolants are virtually invisible on the road surface, though your nose can often alert you to their presence. A thin sprinkling of sand can reduce traction but can be very hard to spot, and you certainly won't smell it.

Lighting can also limit you. A low sun glaring into your eyes can make it very difficult to see much of anything, and I frequently end up riding one-handed as I use my left hand to shade my eyes in this situation. A low-hanging sun can also throw shadows across turns. On more than one occasion I have watched a rider dive into a shady corner and emerge sliding on his butt after encountering sand, leaves or some other slippery material hidden in the shade.

Shade can actually create a hazard. The coastal mountains around Los Angeles frequently get a nice coating of dew overnight, and the winding roads that traverse them are often slippery until the sun reaches them and dries the dew. However, during the winter months, the sun may never get high enough to remove the dew from a corner, so the shaded portion remains wet all day. These moist patches will often exactly match the shaded area, making it very difficult to tell that the road is wet unless you are aware of this situation. In colder places, the shaded area may hide black ice, and in fact this dew sometimes freezes on cold nights, even in the SoCal mountains.

Anyway, whether it's shaded dew, sand, oil or a warthog, any hazard that you discover on your intended line as the turn reveals itself requires an alternate plan. If you have entered the corner at a reduced speed, you should have enough reserve traction to do some braking, even though you are leaned over. The slower you are going, the more options you have, including perhaps stopping. And if your only option ends up being an off-road excursion, reducing your speed means you will do less damage to the guardrail or tree that you hit.

If you are going slow enough, you can simply straighten up and ride across something slippery. If the hazard is in the middle of the lane, with some reserve in hand you can go around it. I prefer to tighten my line and go inside, because that allows me more options for the rest of the turn if there are further hazards. Also, if I misjudged, I can straighten up and still have pavement left to use for further slowing and changing my line. Going around a hazard on the outside often leaves you leaning over close to the edge of the road, so there is no room to straighten up and remain on the road if things don't go according to plan.

Fortunately, there are plenty of brightly lit, perfectly clean corners that you can see all the way through before you have to commit to a line and speed. Those are what make all the dirty, slimy, frog-infested ones worthwhile.

PEACE
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PostSubject: RIDING APPAREL   Mon Sep 10, 2007 3:31 pm

Kindda long,but nice info though.Read if you free. Cool


Because your choice of riding gear is as important to making motorcycling fun as your choice of motorcycle, Motorcycle Cruiser magazine includes regular articles about riding apparel. The right gear makes motorcycling safer and more comfortable through a wide range of conditions. Yet apparel-buying decision may be based on little more than what the wearer sees while standing in front a mirror. Consider a riding jacket. Most riders buy on style, but a real riding jacket should do much more than look good. With a bit of augmentation (layering), it should actually increase your comfort throughout the range of temperatures you ride in, serve your needs on the road, prevent damage to your machine, ward of gravel and bugs, and on that day when something goes wrong, provide significant protection from abrasion and even impact. That's the difference between a motorcycle jacket, and good-looking but functionally empty jacket.

Be Cool

You can actually be cooler in a solid crash-resistant motorcycle jacket than in a T-shirt in hot weather, but the jacket must have good venting in places where the moving air touches it. If you ride behind a large windshield, that means that it must have vents out on the sleeves, perhaps even on the outside of the sleeves. I have a Firstgear jacket, for example, with a unique scoop on the outside of the forearms to catch air flowing around the shield. If you don't have a windshield, then large vents in the upper chest, such as the tuck-away panels on some Vanson jackets, are a cool solution. What goes in must come out, so the jacket should have exit venting on the back too. If you are buying a jacket just for warm weather one of the mesh motorcycle jackets can actually keep you cooler while moving than riding in just a shirt.

Those vents can be a liability on cold rides, so if you plan to use a mesh or vented jacket in a wider range of temperatures, there should be some means of sealing them. An insulating liner increases a jacket's cold-weather utility. A longer jacket, especially one with some sort or belt or elastic waist, will reduce the drafts that can blow up your back and chill your kidneys.

Various other design features can expand a jacket's temperature range. If the front closure features a snap-down flap over the zipper, you might be able to get air flowing through by unzipping the jacket most of the way but using the snaps to keep yourself fully covered. Sleeves that close with a zipper plus a snap can provide a similar option to keep the closure intact but let some air flow through.

The Fine Points

Massive zippers, fancy snaps or big chrome buckles may look cool, but they can also scratch your bike's paint, especially on the tank. Sleeve zippers and snaps will also come into contact with your bike more frequently than you might suppose. However, don't abandon these kinds of closures in favor of a knit cuff. The problem with knit-style cuffs, often found on aviator-style jackets, is that they permit the sleeve to ride up your arm if you are sliding on it in a crash. The sleeve should close snugly enough that it can not pull up and expose your forearm. You probably want some adjustability in the cuff area though to accommodate additional layers of clothing, watches or gloves. A closure using hook-and-loop material (such as Velcro) can provide great flexibility. Our preference is for a system that uses hook-and-loop material or snaps to adjust the size combined with a zipper (independent of the adjusting system) for closure. The the least convenient cuff systems are those where you must zip and adjust each time you put the jacket on. This is also true of waist adjustments. The adjustments help you accommodate varying layers beneath, but I'd rather just zip the jacket and not have to mess with the belt each time I put it on.

Jacket length is also an issue. Short jackets tend to be the most popular from a styling standpoint, but I have noticed that few experienced riders use them as their primary jacket. Short jackets have a tendency to pull up in a slide, leaving you exposed between the bottom of the jacket and the top of your pants. I prefer a jacket that reaches my hips, since it is less likely to ride up that far in a slide. It also keeps breezes from blowing up my back on colder rides.

Remember that anything you want to reach while riding must be accessible to your left hand, so change pockets for tolls, map pockets, etc. should be on the right side. Zipper pulls should be large enough to grip with heavy gloves. If you are planning on mating the jacket to pants, it's nice if it comes with a zipper for that purpose, though that can be sewed in later. One feature I find indispensable when I'm not using the jacket is a hanging loop.

Motorcycle jackets offer a wide variety of collar styles, including some that zip off. I prefer a tall collar that I can leave open when the weather is warm or closed snugly to fend off cold or bugs. If the collar uses a tab-type closure that fastens with hook-and-loop fastener, the hook portion should be on the tab with a loop patch that allows you to fold the tab inside the jacket when it's not in use. This will prevent the hook section from snagging your helmet strap.

Wear Protection

Soft, supple fashion leather may look good in the showroom, but it provides no real abrasion protection, a fact that will become painfully obvious when you are sliding along the asphalt at 50 mph. It also marks the wearer as a pretender, not a real motorcyclist. That heavy, motorcycle-weight leather may not hug your curves like the paper-thin stuff, but it will break in and become quite comfortable in a few rides. Though you will pay more, riding leather will also last far longer than the fashion-weight stuff.

Armor may seem, well...unseemly, until you need it, then it might prevent broken bones or perhaps even internal injuries. Apparel with armor might look and feel lumpy when you first wear it; although the looks won't change much, we have learned that most armor molds and moves to fit the body it's wrapped around. Though meaningful research is just beginning on what sort of body armor is most effective, it stands to reason that the kind of armor built like a helmet, with an outer shell to spread out the impact load and a layer of slowly resilient foam, is the best bet. However, almost any sort of padding is likely to improve on the impact-absorbing capabilities of leather or cordura.

Leather isn't the only suitable material for motorcycling. Aerostich pioneered protective riding gear made from synthetic materials, and other firms have followed. The Aerostich suit also serves as an example of easy entry, useful features, custom construction, and accessible repair facilities, all points worth considering. The Aerostich suit uses a coated material that can keep you dry in a brief rainstorm, though the coating also blocks air movement. A similar suit from Motoport is not coated, making it significantly cooler in hot weather. To get rain protection, you'll need the firm's liner or a rainsuit worn over it.

PART ONE
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Mon Sep 10, 2007 3:32 pm

PART TWO

Getting into Your Pants

Jeans, especially heavy ones, do offer some protection in a crash. They are substantially better than light slacks and a wolrd ahead of shorts. They may also offer a good level of comfort, protecting your legs from wind and sun and allowing some air to flow over your skin. The only way you are going to get better wind flow with protection is by wearing mesh pants over shorts.

If you are buying pants for protecting your lower region, consider the points above about heavy leather and the need for cuff closures that won't ride up. I am amazed at how often I see people riding in chaps or pants made from fashion-weight leather in hot weather. You get all the lack of cooling with almost none of the protection of serious leather. Chaps that leave your glutes uncovered also make me scratch my head, since most falls leave you with third-degree monkey butt. Instead of chaps, look for overpants with full-length zippers, which make them at least as easy to put on as chaps and provide significantly more protection than open-butt chaps.

Decide how you expect to wear the pants before you go shopping. Will they be worn full-time on the days you ride, and have only underwear beneath? Will you put them on and take them off during the day and wear them over jeans? If so, what will, you have in your jeans pockets? Take the pocket contents along when trying on overpants. Will you be able to reach things in your pockets? If not, where will you put wallet, keys, etc.? Make sure the pants are easy to get on and off if they are to donned and doffed at roadside and that they will roll up into some storable form to strap to or tuck away on your bike. Armor will make this harder, but leaving it out will make falls harder.

Full Coverage

Of course, the best protection comes from a one-piece riding suit. The epitome of street protection and motorcycling functionality is the one-piece Aerostich suit. It is made from heavy materials that provide perotection from the elements and in a crash. Armor panels provide some protection from impacts. There are plenty of reports of people who have crashed at speeds over 100 mph and come to rest with their bodies and Aerostich suits intact. A one-piece Aerostich is almost as easy to don as a jacket—just step into one leg, zip up the mail zipper and the other leg. Its only shortcoming is its limited temperature range, since it doesn't vent too well and requires layers to keep you warm. There are one-piece suits from other btrangs that also provide excellent protection, and Aerostich and others other two-piece suits.

Buying Boots

Unless you are buying boots with some armor over the anklebones, you probably aren't getting any special protection with motorcycle-specific boots. However, one of the many waterproof boots can extend your comfort in the rain, and a motorcycle boot's sole design can improve your riding experience in other ways. Most of all, the sole should provide good traction when you plant it in oil or sand at a stop, to prevent you from tipping over. This is a big problem with cowboy boots on motorcycles; with their smooth soles, they desert you when you need traction on a slick surface. A deep rubber sole can also absorb some vibration. Some motorcycle boots now offer venting, which you might also get with a lace-up style boot.

It can pay to have your motorcycle available while shopping for boots. That's because the boot should work with your foot controls. Boots with a vertical face on the fronts of their heel blocks can limit your options in terms of foot position on footpegs. A ramped heel block may allow you to reach the brake and shift levers more easily. Short-legged riders may find that boots with thick soles (not tall heels) can help them to plant their feet more securely at a stop. (Some also have thicker soles added.)

There is some research that indicates that heavier boots, by increasing the pendulum effect of the foot on your leg, may increase the likelihood of leg fractures in an accident.

I have flat feet, and finding boots that are comfortable to walk in can be a challenge, but they are out there with the other features I want -- easy entry combined with secure fit so they don't fling off in a crash, waterproofing, enough flexibilty to shift and brake, and not too much bulk.

Velvet Fist in the Iron Glove

After a helmet, a solid pair of gloves is the most important protection you can wear while riding. I have heard too many tales of riders who have ground all or part of a finger or thumb off in a crash. A solid glove can at least slow this down.

The best way to have a glove for every situation is to have several sets of gloves. I think the minimum for a serious rider is three sets—a light vented pair for summer, a middleweight pair for in-between weather and a heavy insulated pair for cold rides. I have a box of gloves in the closet, perhaps 20 pairs, and almost every set get used at some point during the year.



Features all motorcycling gloves should have in common are substantial materials, rugged construction, a solid retention system and comfort. For lighter gloves, deerskin or goatskin is a supple and comfortable yet tough material that resists abrasion. Look for seams sewn with tough thread material (turning the gloves inside out may make this easier to examine) and a retention system that holds the glove firmly in place once it's tightened (so that it is not flung off in a crash). If a glove is initially stiff, it will probably soften up and conform to your hand with wear. Gloves that bunch up in the palms will soon become a problem when wrapped around a handlebar. Gloves that are pre-curved—that is, shaped as if ithey were beginning to grab the grip—are less likely to build up in the palm.

My preference for summer gloves is a perforated solid-leather (deerskin or whatever) type. The part-fabric types don't seem strong enough to stay together reliably in a crash. These days you can also find gloves with armor and wind-catching vents from several makers. Fingerless gloves are little better than no gloves at all. If you have seen the remains of hands of people who have endured crashes in fingerless gloves or just the sun- and windburn on riders who have used them on long rides, you'll leave them in your weight room. They have no place on motorcycles.

Some middleweight gloves are waterproof, which is a worthwhile feature. As with heavier winter gloves, the extra material shouldn't make the gloves too stiff or bulk up the palm areas.

Added Warmth

If you want the ultimate in warmth for your hands, consider electric gloves. However, don't buy the gloves until you have the electric vest. All the brands of electric vests that we have tried make a huge dent in cold weather, and by warning your vital organs, they also get your extremities warmer as well. If cold impairs your riding pleasure or control, an electric vest can raise your temperature dramatically and transform an unpleasant experience back into riding fun.

Hat Trick

This article has not discussed helmets, but a good helmet is vital. A helmet is the only piece of riding equipment that can actually save your life in a crash. Even better, it can be difference between spending your life in a wheelchair sucking meals through a straw or living a normal life. I am always amazed at riders who say they are less comfortable riding without a helmet than without one. As our article on picking a helmet points out, if you spend the time and money to buy and adapt to a comfortable full-coverage helmet, it will actually make riding more pleasant by reducing fatigue and noise, protecting your eyes, sheltering you from rain and bugs, providing a controlled flow of air on hot days, making your head warmer on cold days, and keeping the wind and sun from dehydrating you. Riders who have spent the time to try a lot of helmets have all found some that fit them very comfortably, and I don't know any who are more comfortable at speeds above 45 mph, with a good helmet than without it. We have noticed at big cruiser rallies that more riders have stopped following the flock and wearing no helmets or non-DOT novelty beanies and are choosing instead to wear real DOT helmets with actual protection.

Dress to Prevent Accidents

Wearing gear that makes you comfortable and prevent fatigue by blocking wind and noise can help you ride more safely. However, there is an even more dramatic way of dressing to avoid accdents: wear bright colors. Accident causation studies have frequently noted that motorcyclists with light and bright-colored helmets and jackets are less likely to be involved in accidents. Other drivers should see us, but sometimes they don't try hard enough and sometimes the job is made difficult by glare or obstructions that obscure their view. I usually wear a bright orange helmet, and notice a difference when I am wearing something less visibile in traffic. Other drivers are considerably more likely to overlook me. A bright jacket also helps. The colors that seem to be most effective are orange, yellow, white, red and perhaps pink (though there isn't much pink motoprcycle apparel out there). Motorcyclists like the fact that dark colors don't show dirt and perhaps contributes to a bad-ass image, but bright colors are a simple, passive way of avoiding getting flattened.

Around here, new bikes show up all the time, and so does clothing. However, the bikes eventually go back, but when we find apparel we like, we hang onto it. I have a couple of jackets that I still wear that are in their third decade, and most of us have proven pieces of apparel that go along on the long rides, when space is limited and we need to have clothing we can depend on to keep the ride comfortable—and come through in a crash—under a wide range of circumstances. Hopefully, you have or will find those core apparel items too.

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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Wed Sep 12, 2007 10:23 am

thanks Vein... info yang sangat berguna.....

Haa... kengkawan... ada tak baca benda nih?....

Ride... ride jugak... safety kena jaga.... tak guna motot power, cantik tapi owner dah kaput... betoi tak?
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Fri Sep 21, 2007 12:26 am

allop uncle...kasi translate le dalam B.M....aku mana pandai base omputeh ni.... Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Fri Sep 21, 2007 12:32 am

hafizazzim wrote:
allop uncle...kasi translate le dalam B.M....aku mana pandai base omputeh ni.... Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad

Ish! Sejak bila pulak kau bangang English ni Fizan. Sad

Kasi pulang laa itu degree ke UM. cheers
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Fri Sep 21, 2007 12:44 am

aku dulu major bahasa german la batin......gutten tag..... Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Fri Sep 21, 2007 10:22 am

Aku pulak Major bahasa Pasar kahkahkah lol!
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Sat Sep 22, 2007 1:12 pm

hafizazzim wrote:
allop uncle...kasi translate le dalam B.M....aku mana pandai base omputeh ni.... Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad


ko nak kena sula ato ko nak kena ghojam ngan batu?... pilih!!!
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Sat Sep 22, 2007 3:55 pm

Aku rasa,ko kasik je dua-dua eddy,baru FEEL lol!
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Sun Oct 21, 2007 2:26 am

baru-baru no bro sam dah tegaskan tentang ours riding style attitude and safety and banyak dari among of vking ni semua baru2 maybe x pernah join konvoi besar2 so have 0 knowlage about how to ride in a group. ni ada url hand sign ni dari MBC but still usable for us as a reference it is a MUST for all Vkings to remember the hand signal for safety:

http://www.geocities.com/ezzar.geo/

safwan sepatut nyer bawak printout masa TTS ari tu but dia telupa maybe next time la but as for now boleh guna web tu sebagai rujukan and we try to educate our felow vkings for obey the rules.

Long Live Vkings!! Vkings for all!

TQ
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Sun Oct 21, 2007 10:44 pm

zuan wrote:
baru-baru no bro sam dah tegaskan tentang ours riding style attitude and safety and banyak dari among of vking ni semua baru2 maybe x pernah join konvoi besar2 so have 0 knowlage about how to ride in a group. ni ada url hand sign ni dari MBC but still usable for us as a reference it is a MUST for all Vkings to remember the hand signal for safety:

http://www.geocities.com/ezzar.geo/

safwan sepatut nyer bawak printout masa TTS ari tu but dia telupa maybe next time la but as for now boleh guna web tu sebagai rujukan and we try to educate our felow vkings for obey the rules.

Long Live Vkings!! Vkings for all!

TQ

baguih la zuan....yg ni ade B.M...leh la aku paham skit.....
maklum la ..dulu kan aku skolah atap...mane blaja bahse omputeh nih...

kenkawan...meh baca dan hayati bersama.....
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Mon Oct 22, 2007 6:37 pm

Cit...podah la,tak tau English konon Evil or Very Mad
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Mon Oct 22, 2007 11:56 pm

Betul tu Vein..... Hafizz ni sekok lagi nak kena sulo dan ghojam. kihkihkih... Tak tau English konon. BM lebih paham...pooorahhh. Twisted Evil
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Tue Oct 23, 2007 3:07 am

Hampeh Aantu P... Tak paham bahasa omputih ye..... aku cokik ko baru tau....
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Wed Oct 24, 2007 2:39 pm

OK GUYS PLS READ THIS.. MAY BE ITS IS USEFULL FOR US....
RECEANTLY I SEE THAT PEOPLE ARE GOING MAD .. JUST FOR A CAR..
LOOK WHAT HAPPEN TO THE CHAINIS GUY AT PETROLL STATION IN GOMBAK..
FOR GOOD SAKE WE ALL OWN A CAR......

Be EXTRA... EXTRA Careful...

CASE 1: SHAH ALAM


After shopping in 'Macro' Shah Alam, a couple was pushing their trolley
to
their Pajero. The husband went ahead first to get their Pajero. He was
reversed the vehicle to where his wife was standing and came out to help
the wife load their purchases at the back. While doing so, a guy quickly
rushed into the vehicle and drove it off. We saw the wife shouting and
running after their vehicle whilst the husband just froze from shock.
Shortly after regaining his senses he too joined his wife in chasing
after
his vehicle but finally had to give up cos the Pajero has sped off...
They
reported the incident to the Macro's security... but there was nothing
much
they could do...


CASE 2: TAMAN TUN DR ISMAIL


For your safety have a look at this danger point when stopping at petrol
stations. A couple in a Honda Civic stopped by a shop in TTDI. The
husband
went down to buy a packet of cigarettes at the counter. Whilst in full
view
of the husband, 5 male Indonesians jumped into the car and drove it away
with his wife in it.... She was seen screaming and the husband was
shouting
but it was too late... they have driven off with his car and wife.


Similar reports are heard everyday...we certainly have to be more
cautious.


CASE 3: KLCC/TABUNG HAJI


Another area reported by taxi drivers is the KLCC Suria complex. Make
this
known to all your friends... especially ladies BEWARE!


A good friend of mine lost her handbag, a few thousand ringgit and all
her
important documents in it while she was filling petrol at a service
station
near Tabung Haji recently. The handbag was at the back seat and her car
was
locked. She went to pay for petrol before filling it (self-service) not
realizing and knowing that someone was trying! to open the back door
while
she was away at the counter. When she came back to her car no one was
there and did not notice that the back door was already unlocked. Just
when
she was about to fill the tank, a guy appeared, coolly opened her rear
car
door and took her handbag and ran off on a waiting motorcycle nearby. My
friend was hysterical but everything happened so fast and the two
thieves
escaped. A police report was made... and can you imagine, my friend's
case
was the 78th case in that area reported to the police for that week
alone
and most of the victims were ladies.


Well, even when you lock your car doors, something like this still can
happen... what more if you had left it unlocked.... So, take care.


CASE 4: TAIPAN TRIANGLE USJ (MCDONALD'S)


This incident happened right in front of USJ Taipan McDonalds on a
Saturday
nite (17 April). Two armed guys got into the car trying to abduct a lady
and her car .. she managed to put up a fight with them and the guys then
try to push her out of the car... She was dragged on the road with one
of
her leg out of the car for more than 200 meters... finally they took her
in
the car !!


They threatened to KILL her.. but somehow or rather she managed to
escape !


CASE 5: USJ


A man was kidnapped and taken away with his car on Thursday nite!! The
incident started when a car rammed into his car from the back. He was
flagged to stop to talk about the accident, when he stopped his
car....four
guys went straight into his car with parangs. They blindfolded and took
him
with them. He was taken to an isolated place ...where managed to escape
with some struggle .He was badly injured by parangs when he put up a
struggle. Pray for God's protection on all of us.


So please be very careful when you drive alone... Keep your doors lock
whether you are in a public area or in isolate place as it can
happen.....
to YOU !!!!!! . There bad guys are waiting for victims for their next
strike...... ......... ......... ......every single seconds.


The sad truth was that ... while there were many people in USJ Taipan
who
saw the first robbery..... nobody really bothered to help...!! So please
help
yourself first, lock your car doors at all times!! And be constantly
ALERT!!


Don't wait for incident to happen it is too late to
regret...... ......... .....


Its a desperate time right now for robbers..... .... based on the news
you hear or
read daily.


So please be careful as the saying goes........ .......preventio n is
better then
cure!!!!!!!.
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Eddy
roadkill
roadkill


Number of posts : 490
Location : Eeeepo Road KL
Registration date : 13/08/2007

PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Thu Oct 25, 2007 5:18 am

Bro Qbee... thanks for the reminder aka warnings.... betul apa yang bro cakap.... tapi memang dah lumrah manusia.... bila terkena baru nak beringat.... kan baik kalu beringat sebelum terkena.... bersama kita ambil iktibar dari message bro qbee kita ni....

sesal dulu pendapatan... sesal kemudian....hilang pendapatan tiada guna.....


peace afro
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Eddy
roadkill
roadkill


Number of posts : 490
Location : Eeeepo Road KL
Registration date : 13/08/2007

PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Thu Oct 25, 2007 5:48 am

Nak tambah lagi pasai isu safety ni... tak tau cerita ni benar atau tidak.... but its a point to ponder..... got this from an email...





" Kisah di bwh ini di petik dari email member aku.....Kejadian berlaku
semalam 08 Julai, 2007 ke atas adik member aku.

"Adik perempuan aku, nak balik kerumah aku di Selama, nak tengok mak dia
yang pulang dari Mekah. Dia dengan anak serta suami yang 'drive' Kancil
dari P. Pinang, sampai di Sunshine diaorang singgah sekejap untuk beli
susu anak. Hujan lebat masa tu, suami dia keluar kereta dan dia tunggu
dalam kereta. Tak sampai satu minit suaminya keluar, tiba-tiba masuk satu apek tua
dalam kereta terus memperkosa adik aku, setelah puas dia tikam dan robek peha adik aku kemudian dia 'drive' kereta tu sampai ke kawasan hotel Equatorial.

Masa di situ adik aku yang berdarah-darah diugut supaya menyerahkan
semua barang kemas, handphone, duit, sambil tu apek tu letak pisau kat
anak saudara aku yang baru 10 bulan dan mengancam untuk bunuh. "No
choice", adik aku terpaksa serah semuanya dengan kereta sekali dia bawa
lari. Adik aku kena tinggal di kawasan sunyi belakang Bukit Jambul
dengan beg serta anak kecil yang basah kuyup dalam hujan lebat. Hampir
satu jam terbiar di situ tanpa pertolongan, padahal banyak orang lalu lalang,
sampailah ada mamat tolong bawa dia ke hospital. Itupun sebab dia tengok
ada anak kecil, sebab tu dia tolong. - Trauma adik aku sekarang ni.

Akibat kena tikam tu, adik aku kena 11 jahitan di peha, 4 jahitan di
lengan pasal cuba melawan dengan apek haram jadah tu. Jadi kepada semua
kawan-kawan, yang selalu berhenti sekejap di depan kedai, tolong kunci
pintu dari dalam. Cerita adik aku ni boleh jadi pengajaran pada kita
semua.
Duit, barang kemas boleh cari, nyawa tak ada 'spare part'.

Hati-hati, akhir zaman ni nabi sebut terlalu banyak orang jahat. Asal
keluar pintu rumah saja, kita terdedah dengan orang-orang jahat".

Hari ini mungkin terkena pada orang lain, entah esok lusa kena pada kita
dan keluarga kita pulak. Oleh itu marilah kita sama-sama beringat dan
memperingati orang lain pulak...."


Wassalam...
ILYANA ADNAN
Cypark Sdn Bhd
Unit 13A-09, Block A
Phileo Damansara II
No 15, Jalan 16/11
46350 Petaling Jaya
Selangor Darul Ehsan

Tel: 603 76606170
Fax: 603 76606169
E-mail: ilyana@cypark. com.my
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Dr Black
prospect
prospect


Number of posts : 15
Location : JB aka Johor Bahru aka Wilayah Pembangunan Iskandar
Registration date : 05/09/2007

PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Tue Dec 18, 2007 2:45 pm

During my search, suddenly I found this article that I have to share with V'kings Community


"Motorcycling is primarily a solo activity, but for many, riding as a group -- whether with friends on a Sunday morning ride or with an organized motorcycle rally -- is the epitome of the motorcycling experience. Here are some tips to help ensure a fun and safe group ride:
• Arrive prepared. Arrive on time with a full gas tank.
• Hold a riders’ meeting. Discuss things like the route, rest and fuel stops, and hand signals.
• Assign a lead and sweep (tail) rider. Both should be experienced riders who are well-versed in group riding procedures. The leader should assess everyone’s riding skills and the group’s riding style.
• Keep the group to a manageable size, ideally five to seven riders. If necessary, break the group into smaller sub-groups, each with a lead and sweep rider.
• Ride prepared. At least one rider in each group should pack a cell phone, first-aid kit, and full tool kit, so the group is prepared for any problem that they might encounter.
• Ride in formation. The staggered riding formation allows a proper space cushion between motorcycles so that each rider has enough time and space to maneuver and to react to hazards. The leader rides in the left third of the lane, while the next rider stays at least one second behind in the right third of the lane; the rest of the group follows the same pattern. A single-file formation is preferred on a curvy road, under conditions of poor visibility or poor road surfaces, entering/leaving highways, or other situations where an increased space cushion or maneuvering room is needed. Avoid side-by-side formations, as they reduce the space cushion. If you suddenly needed to swerve to avoid a hazard, you would not have room to do so. You don’t want handlebars to get entangled.
• Periodically check the riders following in your rear view mirror. If you see a rider falling behind, slow down so they may catch up. If all the riders in the group use this technique, the group should be able to maintain a fairly steady speed without pressure to ride too fast to catch up. If you’re separated from the group, don’t panic. Your group should have a pre-planned procedure in place to regroup. Don’t break the law or ride beyond your skills to catch up.
• For mechanical or medical problems, use a cell phone to call for assistance as the situation warrants."

"Ride safely, come home happily"
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Undervein 600
roadkill
roadkill


Number of posts : 270
Location : Senawang
Registration date : 13/08/2007

PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Fri Apr 25, 2008 11:03 pm

Safety Ride is slow,but combine with Defensive Riding Technique is good.
Ride at our own pace,don't try to do something crazy stuff on the road.

Do it on the racing Track!

Kehkehkeh,poyo je aku ni. Twisted Evil

Peace!
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PostSubject: Re: Riding/Safety Tips   Today at 1:41 am

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